Local boy with shark
Bora Bora Motu

Bora Bora Motu

Motu Mahana Private Beach

Motu Mahana Private Beach

Jeep Tour

Jeep Tour

Raiatea Isle

Raiatea Isle

Shark Boat

Shark Boat

Wading Waiter with Guests

Wading Waiter with Guests


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South Pacific Destinations

 

Nested in the cool Pacific waters, Polynesian settlers found a string of emerald islands, fruitful and fertile, carpeted with lush rain forests and vibrant life. Scattered over a vast, 2.5 million square kilometres area in the South Pacific, French Polynesia is made up of several series of islands, atolls, and archipelagoes, independently surrounded by lagoons and barrier reefs that create unique ecosystems and divine respites for the traveller weary of the usual getaway.

 

SOCIETY ISLANDS

The Society Islands have been described as "Paradise on Earth" by many travellers. They were explored by Captains Cook and Bligh, but it was the artist, Paul Gauguin that made them truly famous. Author James A. Michener, who wrote more than a dozen works describing life in various pacific cultures, noted that the Society Islands are "so stunning, there are really no adequate words to describe it".

 

COOK ISLANDS

The Cook Islands are a group of fifteen tropical islands set in the heart of the South Pacific, with the largest and possibly the most popular being Rarotonga and Aitutaki. The Islands, named after the Captain Cook, who discovered them, provide spectacular crisp white sand beaches, clear lagoon waters and minimalist, paradise scenery.

 

MARQUESAS ISLANDS

The beautiful Marquesas Islands were originally named "Te Henua Enata" (Land of Men) by the native Polynesian people. They were originally discovered by the Spanish in 1595 and later made famous by Captain James Cook. The novelist Herman Melville then immortalized them in his book "A Peep at Polynesian Life", and by the painter Paul Gauguin who abandoned European civilization to live out his days in these rugged islands. He went to his eternal rest on Hiva Oa, buried beneath a statue of a Polynesian goddess.

 

TUAMOTUS

Drenched in transparent lagoons, the Tuamotus are world-renowned for their snorkeling and diving. This archipelago of 76 low islands and coral atolls are scattered over several hundred miles of the South Pacific ocean. An atoll is a ring of coral that sits on top of an underwater volcano. Inside this ring of coral is a lagoon and outside the ring is the ocean. Some of the atolls have passes that allow allow the tidal currents to enter and leave the lagoon and here is where the most food is for the feeding fish so there is always plenty of excitement.

 

TONGA

The kingdom of Tonga, also known as "The Friendly Islands" for the warm reception Captain Cook received on his first visit in 1773, is situated just west of the International date Line. Thus it is said by the island's tourism industry, that Tonga is 'the place where time begins', although others might observe that it is the place where time stands still, such is the pace of life in Tonga.

 

FIJI

Blessed with blue skies, ivory beaches and azure waters, Fiji is home to more than 300 islands, only about a third of which are inhabited. The majority of Fiji is volcanic in origin and very mountainous with several peaks over 3000 ft. The smaller islands are a mixture of coral and limestone with reefs ringing most islands.

 

AUSTRALS

During the height of the Austral summer (July to October), humpback whales congregate in the waters off Rurutu for pregnant females to give birth, feed their young and let them gain enough weight and strength for the long journey home to their feeding grounds. Humpbacks inhabit all the oceans of the world. However, during this time they leave their cold, rich feeding ground for warm tropical waters, fasting until they return to the cold again around October/November. Rurutu's shallow waters are free of deep-sea predators, and in the event of a storm there are calm lagoons on both sides.